Wine 101

What are some tannin health benefits?

Tannins are compounds found in a wide range of plants, such as coffee, tea, cocoa, and fruits like grapes and cranberries. Tannins health benefits are reported to have a wide range of impact on the human body, some good, others not so good.

Lowered blood pressure, improved immune response, and blood sugar balance are all some of the reported benefits of tannins. Impacted liver function and increased blood pressure are some of the reported dangers of certain tannins.

Disclaimer: This article was not written by medical professionals.

November 17, 2017 / by / in
Can red wine reduce cholesterol levels?

Red wine is reported to assist with boosting “good” cholesterol levels. When consumed as part of a health, balanced, Mediterranean diet, some research points to a reduction in “bad” cholesterol levels. It is unclear as to whether people can consume wine to reduce cholesterol levels.

Disclaimer: This article was not written by medical professionals. Please consult your doctor if you have questions about consuming wine and its effects on your health.

November 17, 2017 / by / in
Any tips on storing wine?

Wines are best stored in a cool, dark place in your house. Preferably, the space will have a stable temperature year-round, and not be actively disturbed. Fluctuations in temperature can cause the wine to “breathe” in the bottle, pulling in air from outside the bottle.

Wine is best stored with bottles on their side, to ensure the corks do not dry out. Dry corks can lead to oxidation and spoilage. If the wine is sealed with a rubber cork or screw cap, they can normally be stored upright.

November 17, 2017 / by / in
When tasting wines, should I rinse the glass after each taste?

Rinsing your glass depends largely on personal preference. If you rinse, try to remove as much water as possible from the glass, as a few drops of water can adversely affect the flavor of the next wine, more than a few drops of the previous wine you tasted.

OregonWines.com staff normally do not rinse when tasting just whites, or just reds – but if we are going to taste both whites and reds in one session, we will rinse our glasses after we have finished tasting the whites, before we move on to the reds.

November 17, 2017 / by / in
What is meant by “mouthfeel”?

Mouthfeel refers to how the wine feels in your mouth. The sugars, acids, alcohol, tannins, and various other components in the wine will affect the way it coats and interacts with your mouth.

Sweeter wines, such as dessert wines, will have a softer, syrupy mouth feel more than a dry wine. A full-bodied red wine, higher in tannins and alcohol, with have more of an edge – almost a bite – as it hits your taste buds, and moves around on your tongue.

Generally speaking, wines with a softer or smoother mouthfeel tend to have a longer, lingering finish, and the wine will evenly coat your tongue, just as it will your throat when you swallow it.

November 17, 2017 / by / in
What is a buttery wine?

A “buttery wine” refers to a wine containing lower amounts of acids, which result in a smooth, silky, even creamy feel in the mouth. This can be the result of ageing methods. For example, a Chardonnay wine, aged in an oak barrel, often imparts a buttery flavor.

As implied, a buttery wine rolls over your tongue as would liquid butter.

November 17, 2017 / by / in
What are wine legs? What are tears?

Wine legs and tears are caused by wine dribbling down the sides of a wine glass. They are most often visible after tasting a wine, when the glass has been tilted on its side, and then righted.

Some of the wine will have coated the inner sides of the glass, and will begin dripping back down into the bottom. This is caused by alcohol in the wine evaporating, breaking the surface tension on the upper edge of the wine, causing the watery components to fall away back into the glass.

The shape and size of the legs are a sign of the wine’s viscosity (which in turn is affected by the amount of glycerols and alcohol found in the wine).

A wine with low viscosity will have smaller, more watery legs. A wine with higher viscosity will have larger, slower legs.

November 17, 2017 / by / in