Wine 101

What is meant by “nosing” a wine?

“Nosing a wine” refers to smelling the wine. When smelling a wine, the taster dips their nose into the upper portion of the wine glass (not into the wine itself) and breathes in the aromas coming off of the wine. Depending on the complexity of wine and the varietal of the grapes used in its production, a wine’s aromas may cultivate in many, deep layers of smells throughout the glass, so when smelling the wine, the taster may dip their nose deeper and deeper into the glass.

November 20, 2017 / by / in
Do wines contain antioxidants?

All wines contain some antioxidants. Antioxidants are believed to provide health benefits, though when consumed with alcohol, some or many of those benefits may be lessened or completely nullified.

Red wines contain a much higher concentration of resveratrol, a potent antioxidant derived from the skins of red wine grapes.

Additional phenolic compounds from grape stems and seeds, and other tannins, also contain some antioxidants.

 

November 17, 2017 / by / in
What are some tannin health benefits?

Tannins are compounds found in a wide range of plants, such as coffee, tea, cocoa, and fruits like grapes and cranberries. Tannins health benefits are reported to have a wide range of impact on the human body, some good, others not so good.

Lowered blood pressure, improved immune response, and blood sugar balance are all some of the reported benefits of tannins. Impacted liver function and increased blood pressure are some of the reported dangers of certain tannins.

Disclaimer: This article was not written by medical professionals.

November 17, 2017 / by / in
Can red wine reduce cholesterol levels?

Red wine is reported to assist with boosting “good” cholesterol levels. When consumed as part of a health, balanced, Mediterranean diet, some research points to a reduction in “bad” cholesterol levels. It is unclear as to whether people can consume wine to reduce cholesterol levels.

Disclaimer: This article was not written by medical professionals. Please consult your doctor if you have questions about consuming wine and its effects on your health.

November 17, 2017 / by / in
Any tips on storing wine?

Wines are best stored in a cool, dark place in your house. Preferably, the space will have a stable temperature year-round, and not be actively disturbed. Fluctuations in temperature can cause the wine to “breathe” in the bottle, pulling in air from outside the bottle.

Wine is best stored with bottles on their side, to ensure the corks do not dry out. Dry corks can lead to oxidation and spoilage. If the wine is sealed with a rubber cork or screw cap, they can normally be stored upright.

November 17, 2017 / by / in
How long is it before a wine goes bad or “turns”?

When a wine goes bad (“turns”), it is due to several possible factors. Possible reasons include oxidation, bacterial spoilage, or simple age. There may be noticeable off-aromas or flavors (or both). The wine may begin to re-ferment, and may be completely undrinkable.

As a wine ages in its bottle, minute amounts of air seep into the bottle through the cork. Rubber corks and metal screw caps can prevent this, but can create other possible problems of their own.

If a wine bottle is stored on its side, the cork will not dry out, and this can prevent spoilage. Wine bottles that are stored upright will tend to see their corks dry out, and that can lead to oxidation.

Storing wine in a cool, dark place, with a relatively stable temperature and humidity throughout the year, can prevent fluctuations in the air pressure in the bottle, which also can prevent spoilage issues.

Generally speaking, most red wines peak in quality at around 8-10 years of bottling, and then begin to slowly diminish. Most white wines don’t improve much once bottled, and will generally keep for 6-8 years before losing their luster.

November 17, 2017 / by / in